Lamb

Lamb is our favorite meat because of the flavor but also because we believe that it is a more pure animal. Yes, we use heritage breeds but because of the mass production of pork, beef and chicken the lines might not be as untouched as lambs which have not been as industrialized.

Once a year (Fall only ) we do orders for 1/2 and whole Lambs.

Currently taking orders for October 2017.

Lamb will come cut from a USDA inspected butcher, vacuumed sealed in clear packages, each type of cut is labeled on the packaging and can be frozen for at least up to a year.

We always have Cuts for sale at “The Back Porch” here on the farm or at the Farmer’s Markets.

 

Lamb Prices

Lamb will come cut from a USDA inspected butcher, vacuumed sealed in clear packages, each type of cut is labeled on the packaging and can be frozen for at least up to a year.

We always have Cuts for sale at “The Back Porch” here on the farm or at the Farmer’s Markets.

Whole Lamb approximately 35 to 40 lbs $11.00 a lb approximately $440*
50% now  $220* and the balance when you pick up.
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Half Lamb approximately 17 to 20 lbs $12.00 a lb approximately $240*
50% now  $120* and the balance when you pick up.
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If you are not able to pay the 50% now, a $100* dollar non refundable deposit will hold a lamb for you.

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Offal is not included in the weight: subject to availability

$5.75* a lb (total weight varies will know exact weight at time of pick up)

Liver
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Kidney
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Heart
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Tongue
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* THESE ARE CASH OR CHECK PRICES  If paying online add 3%

  • Custom Processing, if you order a whole pig and would like specialty cuts that are different from the list below .50 per lb more do at the time of pick up
  • The cut list below shows the average cuts from a whole lamb order.If you are ordering a half of a lamb, you can safely half the numbers you see.
  • If a whole lamb is a little more than you need, find a friend or family member to share an order with!

Half lamb will be cut as follows:

  • 1 shank
  • 2 shoulder roasts
  • 1 loin roast
  • Loin chops
  • Whole leg of lamb
  • Lamb rib rack
  • 1-2 ground lamb

 

 

  • Freezer space: When calculating freezer space, allow for 1 cubic foot/30-35 lbs of meat. (A whole lamb requires 1 cubic feet.) Chest freezers generally utilize space better than upright freezers.Lamb comes packaged small enough to serve two people. ( chops come two per package ) If you are serving more than two people, you can easily add packages to accommodate the size of your family. All meat is frozen at our USDA inspected butcher and vacuum packaged allowing it to be stored in the freezer for 1 year. Each type of cut is labeled on the packaging.

John Pace-007What are these lambs fed? How are they raised ? Where do they live?

You can’t get more LOCAL than this! As a 3rd Generation Rancher, John Pace has a respect for the land he owns and loves the small flock of sheep he raises. He is still breeding from his fathers line of Rambouillet sheep. The lamb tastes mild and delicious. They are never vaccinated or given hormones. They are never fed GMO corn, soy or fed any animal by-products. 

 We live less then 2 miles from John Pace and his farm. We have the privilege of being a part of his “lambing season” each year.We have slept in the lambing sheds when they are giving birth and have watched and worked with  this Shepard to see and witness firsthand the tender care he uses to raise his flock.The lambs are never separated from their mothers. We have been on the “mountain (1000 acres of grass)” too but he is the one who spends his summers up their. The lambs are born in April and harvested in Fall.  The bucks are put with the ewes and the cycle starts all over again.
 
John Pace-002“I know the lambs are good because of what they eat on the Kanarra Mountain pastures.  They have their mother’s milk and expand their diet more and more with the grasses and  browse found there.  They are never given growth hormones, steroids, antibiotics, or grains, but do eat the seed from the mountain’s natural grasses when they come on.  The government trapper once observed that they don’t even put their heads down as they go along eating the seed from the tall grass.  Finally, they are finished as the acorns begin to fall.  They love acorns and chase them like they were green feed coming on in the spring.  These natural feeds combine to make a succulent meat that is unparalleled for taste and quality.  You are getting the very best of the best in a locally produced meat.”
John Pace.
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